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FEATURED ARTIST OF THE MONTH: BELGIN BOZSAHIN

“Brown and Blue”

How do you begin your work?

If there is something personal that I want to express then I take notes, draw but mostly write on my drawings. That way I can express the feeling I am having, particularly for the porcelain body casts or the sculptures.

If I am working intuitively in an abstract way, such as on the highly textural wall panels, then I prepare the ribbon-like strings of clay or the scale-like pieces by hand a day or two before and keep them moist so that I can work quickly on the form.

How do you see your materials? Are these all things that you imagine before starting each piece or do they develop during the process?

I like working intuitively, without sketching or preparing too much beforehand. I wouldn’t say I like too much control and want to allow the fire and nature of the material create on the forms. Of course there is a thought process and imagining the outcome I would like to have. Yet it is mostly allowing the “flow” and the material to guide me. It is a two-way conversation, I am taking great effort to hear the other side.

Please tell us about your work and what drew you to creating works using hand formed porcelain?

I come from a fine art background working in oils. When I think back, I see that there was a need to capture three-dimensional form with more tactile surfaces which pushed me to work with different materials over the years.  As my materials changed from paint to paper to yarn and fabric later on, and then to much harder materials like marble and mosaic, my work became more textured and moving among dimensions has become a natural progress in my development.

Porcelain by its nature is not an easy material to hand form, yet its unique tactile qualities are somehow addictive to touch. Among various clays that I worked with, porcelain became the one that I liked working with the most, due to its unique yet contrasting qualities such as being silky soft and delicate yet strong and robust.

“Large Colour Abstract 5

Tell us more about the development of ‘Large Colour Abstract 5’, the processes and techniques you have used?

I enjoy working with different techniques and processes that help me to actualize my ideas. Creating surfaces that entice the touch, present layers are something I have always been interested in my work.

The piece is part of a series of six wall panels. They develop from a need to work intuitively.  One day I started shaping small porcelain pieces in my hand before embedding them onto a porcelain surface. The experimenting with “scale like” pieces that have different qualities such as size, texture, colour, led me to carry on working in this fashion.

“If We Only Know” (sold)

What do your wall body sculptures mean to you, or what do you hope a viewer takes away from your work?

We, as human beings are very complex creatures. About 30 years ago, my questioning about life and what it is that I am looking for took me to a personal search within me. I started to feel a deeper understanding of myself; I started to observe the difference and somewhat contrasting qualities of what is within and outside of me. As a being our experiences are vast and varied immensely. Yet even though I feel my feelings are mine and personal, they are also universal.

I hope my work reflects on or reminds us of something that we already know.

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